Visit Facebook Barakah Page @1000fold – His Highness the Aga Khan: A Visual and Textual Celebration, 1957 – 2017 — Simerg – Insights from Around the World

Great pieces at http://www.barakah.com! Reader: I thoroughly enjoy reading the Daily Nation regularly. The writers know how to make the stories interesting. The format is excellent. The writers know how to attract the readers, as the story flows smoothly. It is fun reading these stories and one gets educated with the use of different vocabulary, […]

via Visit Facebook Barakah Page @1000fold – His Highness the Aga Khan: A Visual and Textual Celebration, 1957 – 2017 — Simerg – Insights from Around the World

Concrete Proposal towards “Hunza Power Supply Company”

Kinetic energy of water flow in a stream or river is a renewable source of energy abundantly available in our region. Harnessing this source through well established methods is both capital and time intensive. I am suggesting an alternate technology suited from affordability as well as indigenous manufacture en  mass. This involves use of a “floating hydro-electric generator” tethered to the anchors on river bank and suited to minimum flow in winters and also swollen rivers during summers.
Objective: To provide electricity to each village independently through self-help and gradually increasing the capacity to meet entire demand needed towards economic transformation.
Inspiration
Lets see and create something that has the same look and feel that can be seen in this video I found the other day.

Levels / Stages
Prototype Development and functionality Tests
Need interested youngsters ready to go for a career in this field to participate.
Collaboration by government and established CSOs such as AKRSP is highly desirabl.
Please feel free to add or update these if you think I missed anything!

Experience Shared: On the other hand, don’t under-estimate what one person looking to change their piece of the world can do. Before I bought the FITZ Waterwheel company, I had been through some hard times. Now 6 years later, I operate 1250 kilowatts of generators commercially, providing clean, environmentally safe power to over 1000 homes. I hope you have as much fun and satisfaction with your waterwheel, whatever the size.
(Rudy Behrens owns the FITZ Waterwheel Company. 118 Sycamore Ct., Collegeville, PA 19426, Phone: (215) 489-6256.)

Conflict of Interest

A company owned by the family of Jared Kushner, U.S. President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, stands to receive over $400 million from China’s Anbang Insurance Group, that is investing in a Manhattan building owned by the Kushners, Bloomberg reported. Details of the agreement are being circulated to attract additional investors, Bloomberg reported on Monday. The building,…

via Kushner Family Stands to Get $400 Million from a Chinese Firm in Real Estate Deal — TIME

Open Educational Resources about BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Open Educational Resources about BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

 

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11.014J American Urban History II | Urban Studies and Planning

Language:

English

Institution:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology OEC Member

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Arts / Architecture

This is a seminar course that explores the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks. The course gives students .. show the rest of description.

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11.437 Financing Economic Development | Urban Studies and Planning

Language:

English

Institution:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology OEC Member

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Arts / Architecture

This course focuses on financing tools and program models to support local economic development. It includes an overview of private capital markets and financing sources to understand capital market imperfections that constrain economic development; business accounting; financial statement .. show the rest of description.

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11.947 Urbanization and Development | Urban Studies and Planning

Language:

English

Institution:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology OEC Member

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Arts / Architecture

The course examines the causes and effects of rapid urbanization in developing countries. Using case studies from the world’s four major developing regions, including (among others) Mexico City, Buenos Aires, Managua, Singapore, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Kabul, Beirut, Cairo, Kinshasa, Cape Town and .. show the rest of description.

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15.990 Architecture and Communication in Organizations | Sloan School of Management

Language:

English

Institution:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology OEC Member

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Management

While no businesses succeed based on their architecture or space design, many fail as a result of inattention to the power of spatial relationships. This course demonstrates through live case studies with managers and architects the value of strategic space planning and decision making in relation .. show the rest of description.

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4.285 Research Topics in Architecture: Citizen-Centered Design of Open Governance Systems | Architecture

Language:

English

Author:

Mitchell, William

Institution:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology OEC Member

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Arts / Architecture

In this seminar, students will design and perfect a digital environment to house the activities of large-scale organizations of people making bottom-up decisions, such as with citizen-government affairs, voting corporate shareholders or voting members of global non-profits and labor unions. A .. show the rest of description.

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Advertising and Promotion

Language:

English

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Marketing / Advertising

The purpose of this course is to lead students in an exploration of fundamental advertising principles and the role advertising plays in the promotional mix. Although some consider all promotion synonymous with advertising, unique characteristics separate advertising from other forms of .. show the rest of description.

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Quantitative Analysis

Language:

English

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Economics / Mathematical and Quant.
  • Business / General
  • Social Sciences / Statistics

This course is designed to introduce you to quantitative analysis (QA), or the application of statistics in the workplace. The student will learn how to apply statistical tools to analyze data, draw conclusions, and make predictions of the future. This free course may be completed online at any .. show the rest of description.

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Corporate Communication

Language:

English

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Management
  • Humanities / Communication Studies

Effective communication skills are a prerequisite for succeeding in business. Communication tools and activities connect people within and beyond the organization in order to establish the business’s place in the corporate community and the social community, and as a result, that communication .. show the rest of description.

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Financial Accounting

Language:

English

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Accounting / Financial

This course focuses on financial accounting, a sub-discipline of accounting. The information generated in financial accounting is often used by individuals external to the organization, such as creditors, investors, government regulatory agencies, and taxing authorities. Additionally, business .. show the rest of description.

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Human Resource Management

Language:

English

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Management / Human Resources

Managing Human Capital involves strategically allocating the most valuable resources—people—to the right areas of a firm. The basics of managing human capital are covered in any basic management course, but this course will introduce more advanced topics in the field. The student will learn .. show the rest of description.


Management Information Systems

Language:

English

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Management
  • Science and Technology / Information Technology

Management Information Systems (MIS) is a formal discipline within business education that bridges the gap between computer science and the well-known business disciplines of finance, marketing, and management. In its most general terms, information systems encompass any interactions between .. show the rest of description.

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Managerial Economics Principles

Language:

English

Author:

Unknown

Institution:

Lardbucket.org

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Economics / General

One standard definition for economics is the study of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. A second definition is the study of choice related to the allocation of scarce resources. The first definition indicates that economics includes any business, nonprofit

.. show the rest of description.

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Negotiations and Conflict Management

Language:

English

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Management / Conflict Resolution

This course examines the conceptual framework of negotiations as applied to all areas of negotiation in both the public and private sectors, focusing specifically on business negotiations later in the course. It also uncovers the influence of national and cultural variations in the decision-making .. show the rest of description.

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Operations Management

Language:

English

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Management / Production and Oper Mgnt

This course covers the fundamentals of operations management as they apply to both production and service-based operations. Operations management is a science with which we are all, in some capacity, familiar. We all have scarce resources and have to allocate those resources properly. In the realm .. show the rest of description.

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Principles of Marketing

Language:

English

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Marketing / General

In this course, the student will learn about the entire marketing process and examine the range of marketing decisions that an organization must make in order to sell its products and services. The student will learn to ask: what does the customer need? What does the customer want? Who is this .. show the rest of description.

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Risk Management

Language:

English

Author:

The Saylor Foundation

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Finance

This is a free online course offered by the Saylor Foundation.

‘The Business Administration major is designed to prepare you for a leadership role in today’s highly competitive, global business environment.  This elective course will allow you to incorporate risk management principles into your

.. show the rest of description.

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Small Business Management

Language:

English

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Management

This course introduces entrepreneurship and business planning and is geared towards both the eclectic mix of individuals planning to develop and launch their own businesses as well as those with established small business ventures. Topics include the history of small business, the characteristics .. show the rest of description.

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Strategic Information Technology

Language:

English

Institution:

The Saylor Foundation

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Management / Strategy
  • Science and Technology / Information Technology

This course focuses on the allocation and use of technology resources across an entire firm as part of the larger organizational strategy. This course introduces some advanced topics for those familiar with the “nuts and bolts” of information systems. This free course may be completed online at .. show the rest of description.

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15.518 Taxes and Business Strategy

Language:

English

Author:

Prof. George Plesko

Institution:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology OEC Member

MERLOT

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Categories:

  • Business / Accounting / Managerial

Traditional finance and other business courses analyze a broad spectrum of factors affecting business decision-making but typically give little systematic consideration to the role of taxes. In contrast, traditional tax accounting courses concentrate on administrative issues while ignoring the .. show the rest of description.

 

  • Course Introduction

US firms maintain their competitive advantages by holding on to resources their competitors cannot obtain. What do we mean by “resources?” The term “resources” can refer to anything from rights to a certain oil field, the patent on touchscreen technology, or an exclusive contract with the government. More often than not, however, a company’s most valuable resources are its employees. Often, having the “right” employees – the individuals capable of developing iPhones or finding new oil fields – separates the highly successful firms from their less successful competitors. As you begin the journey of this course, you might be saying to yourself, “My company may say I am its most valuable resource, but it really do not treat me like I am valued.” This feeling is one of many elements associated with managing human capital.

In the United States, the subfield of Human Resource Management (alternatively known as Human Capital Management) has a history that dates back almost a century, but the most strategic components of this course emerged as a result of transitions in the workforce in the late 1960s. After the passing of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, all organizations were mandated by the Federal Government to adhere to specific laws, which governed how an organization should respond to and treat their human capital. The transition of women and minorities into the workplace and their resulting contributions to business success incentivized organizations to develop a better understanding of how to integrate all employees into a culture that would reinforce and support the vision and mission of a business.

Human Resource Management refers to the practice of strategically allocating the most valuable resources – people – to the right areas of a firm. This practice involves careful strategizing, good leadership, and other solid business practices. Human Resource Management requires more than a strong human resources department; it requires smart, capable team managers working in conjunction with an HR department to carry out common goals.

The key to understanding and applying the concepts of this course revolves around learning how to become uncomfortable. What exactly does that mean? Every one of us has a core belief system shaped by our individual experiences, situations, and circumstances. This belief system informs and guides our perceptions (i.e. what we believe is or is not valid/applicable to the situation or circumstance with which we are dealing). We naturally gravitate towards those things with which we have some understanding, and we have an intrinsic bias against those things that do not make sense to us, that we perceive as unethical, or that make us uncomfortable. To effectively manage human capital, you have to learn how to step outside of your comfort zone and make strategic decisions in the best interest of the company, rather than those that make you “comfortable.”

You know the basics of managing human capital from your Principles of Management course (BUS208), but this course will introduce you to more advanced topics in the field. You will learn that identifying the best employees begins with identifying the firm’s needs and carrying out a proper recruitment and selection process. Training, development, and performance evaluations can then shape the selected employee into an ideal firm resource. Finally, adequate and incentivizing compensation can keep those resources with the firm. This course will cover all these topics and more.

Though you may not be planning to pursue a career in human resource management, much of your career success will depend upon working with the right people. This course will help you appreciate and leverage this fact.

People are a firm’s most valuable resource, and many of the most successful firms proudly profess this fact in recruitment materials, press events, and statements of their corporate values. Human Resource Management has been a focus in corporate strategy for the last half-century, especially in light of the emergence of a service-based economy (whereby most firms today provide services as opposed to the products produced by firms in the past).

In this unit, you will learn about the role that Human Capital Management plays within any organization. You will also review a variety of major topics pertaining to human capital, including the nature of HR management, strategies for HR management and planning, the legal framework for equal employment as it applies to managing diversity, and the application of affirmative action. Some of these subjects are so complex and diverse that they deserve their own courses. For example, the field of Managing Equal Employment and Diversity is so broad that the US federal government has created the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to ensure that individuals receive equal treatment in employment-related activities. These topics will be touched upon in this unit to so that you can focus on the core of human capital management in the remaining units.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 13 hours.

Now that you understand the core components of strategy as applied to managing human capital, learn how to identify the right human capital by properly assessing and defining all of the jobs within an organization. Identifying the right people for a firm can be very difficult. To make things more challenging, job descriptions often do a poor job of detailing the employment environment. By conducting a proper job analysis of all roles within a firm, hiring managers can better identify the traits they need a future employee to possess for a specific job.

Employers seek employees with traits that fall into one of four categories: Knowledge, Skills, Abilities, and Other Characteristics. Collectively, these traits are referred to as KSAs. The keys to success lay not in an individual’s experience with Microsoft Office or his or her ability to work in a high stress environment, but rather in his or her capacity to learn on the job, humility in admitting fault, and temperament in a stressful situation. In this unit, you will learn how to identify the true demands of a job and translate them into an accurate job description.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 10 hours.

Identifying the traits one will need for success in a position is relatively easy compared to the daunting task of identifying those traits within an applicant. Given the cyclicality of unemployment, you will likely receive a pile of resumes simply by posting an opening on a company website or job board. But how many of those resumes will be worth looking through? How many will be worth interviewing? And will any of them be the right person for the job? You do not want to just select the best person in the applicant pool; you want to find the best person for the job. Sometimes this means going beyond the normal labor market and recruiting people currently employed at other firms.

There are a number of methods of recruiting the right talent. Some firms prefer to use specialized recruiting firms, while others ask their current employees for recommendations. The point is that a firm needs to cast the widest net possible in order to secure a large applicant pool.

Then, the firm must face the challenge of selecting the right applicant by determining whether he or she possesses the KSAs discussed in the last unit. Like it or not, the interview method of selection is one of the weakest forms of selection. Critics argue that it is too subjective. While subjectivity is not a bad thing, it must be paired with the right objective measures. This unit will cover a number of such measures that can be useful in identifying candidates. Please note that interviews are still very important and that there are “right” and “wrong” ways to conduct interviews, all of which will be addressed here.

One of the key points to remember when recruiting and selecting human capital is that you should identify individuals who share the company’s ideas about the goals and objectives of its business. You should work to identify unique individuals with shared and complementary skill sets in order to build an effective team. Recruiting and selecting human capital should be carried out in order to provide the organization with a strategic advantage.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 7 hours.

Once you have completed the recruitment process, it is crucial that you properly train and develop your human capital. As you go through this unit, think of training as a process used to inform new members of the specifics associated with the jobs that they have assumed. Development should be thought of as a continuous process of improvement and as an opportunity to provide human capital with the updates and insight needed to be successful on the job. Career planning refers to the process of mapping the career growth of your human capital and building strong relationships between human capital and the management team. Note: Career planning is sometimes referred to as succession planning.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 4 hours.

In the last unit, you learned about human capital development and training. Mastering and applying this information is crucial to helping you become more effective at identifying and creating a performance management and measurement system. Firms often use performance management systems in order to properly identify the success of their employees. “Success” in the workplace is often defined by an individual’s ability to live up to the demands of his or her position. With proper job analysis, it should be easy to quantify the level of success or failure that each employee has reached. However, it is important to recognize that all humans are subject to certain biases – leniency and the halo effect are good examples – when asked to provide feedback. (Leniency refers to a manager’s tendency to be “too nice” out of fear of hurting the feelings of his or her employee. The halo effect refers to a situation in which a manager focuses on one positive aspect of an employee’s performance as opposed to the performance as a whole over the evaluation period. The manager might, for example, fixate on the fact that an employee obtained a high-profile client or made a profitable sale, despite poor performance in all other aspects of the job.) Employees should be made aware of such tendencies in order to strive toward a more balanced evaluation process.

Meanwhile, in a performance appraisal, one employee (frequently a manager) reviews the performance of another employee. Many successful firms (including Infosys, one of the largest IT companies in India) use what are known as “360 degree reviews.” In the 360 degree review, the employee also reviews the manager. Firm managers should explore various types of appraisal systems in order to determine which fits best with the firm’s culture and strategy.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 4 hours.

When an employer is making a hiring decision, he or she must consider a number of factors, including the cost of compensating human capital. In most cases within a business, this is the highest overhead cost consumed by an organization. Because poor financial planning is one of the top 10 risk factors associated with business failure, it is extremely important that an employer understands the many elements associated with the development and application of a compensation program. An employer must also be aware of compensation, as it is a tool used to attract and retain human capital. At different stages of an employee’s life, he or she will have different workplace needs. An organization may have some employees who value direct financial compensation and others who have an immediate need for other, more indirect benefits, like tuition reimbursement or child care. The key is to understand the dynamics of a compensation program and develop an organizational program that serves the needs of the organization, as well as the human capital employed by the organization.

In times of recession, there is usually a larger labor force in search of work. This gives employers leverage when hiring; some can drive down the associated human capital cost of employment due to the high supply of labor. However, the key to retaining good people in any environment, including in periods of high growth, is usually compensation. Compensation is not just about a salary or bonus – it is about work/life balance, perks, and contentment. The happiest employees are not necessarily the ones in the highest pay grade. Often times, the most successful companies pay less than their competitors because they have created an environment that is pleasant to work in.

Much of the chatter surrounding compensation today revolves around executive pay, as the disparity between executive pay and employee pay has grown dramatically over the decades. This widening gap is largely due to the fact that firms have been aligning executive compensation with firm performance. For publicly traded companies, performance is often measured in terms of profitability or stock price performance. This system is problematic in that it incentivizes executives to take on too much risk, as they are guaranteed compensation no matter what happens. This unit will explore this issue as well as others pertaining to compensation and benefits.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 6 hours.

By now, you should more fully understand the significance of managing human capital as a strategic part of any business platform. It is important that you recognize how all of the human capital management concepts come together to support an organization that enjoys a competitive advantage over others within its market. It is also important that you understand that the employer is responsible for making the job attractive to potential human capital candidates and enticing them with an environment that incentivizes employees to work and grow with the organization. While you have covered a lot as this course has progressed, there are still some key factors to be addressed as you develop an understanding of how to manage human capital. One of those key areas is the safety and health of human capital.

At a most basic level, the employer is responsible for sending its employees home in the same manner in which they arrived. The concept of safety is so important that the government has created a special department – the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) – whose sole focus is the safety and well-being of employees within the workplace. Every single workplace environment must comply with OSHA regulations.

Employers must also be concerned with the health of their human capital. Healthy employees boost workplace performance and productivity, use fewer sick day benefits, and are more likely to build stronger and longer-lasting relationships with their employers. When an employee or potential employee sees that an employer is concerned about his or her personal well-being, he or she is more likely to become and remain a part of that organization. Note: Employee Health is sometimes referred to as employee wellness.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 6 hours.

In this final unit of the course, we will discuss labor and employee relations and conclude with a brief perspective on how ethical concerns pervade all aspects of human resource management. As mentioned earlier in the course, an employer wants to create an environment that is attractive to potential and current employees. As you have already learned, the relationship between employer and employee can be a bit tricky. The employer has specific expectations when it makes the decision to bring a new employee on board. The employee has or should have an expectation of the employer when he or she decides to join and/or stay with an organization. Sometimes, there are significant discrepancies between what the employer needs/wants and what the employee needs/wants. In these situations, labor relations – or more specifically, labor unions – can help strengthen the employer/employee relationship.

Labor relations is a subfield of Human Capital Management concerned with labor unions in the workplace. Labor unions are independent third parties that represent the collective interest of the employees within a particular industry. Just as a marriage counselor serves as a mediator between a husband and a wife, a labor union seeks to balance the differences between employer and employee.

Employee relations is a subfield of Human Capital Management concerned with the prevention and/or resolution of workplace problems. This subfield encompasses poor performance and disciplinary action, the identification and promotion of policies/procedures, and the communication and promotion of awareness of the laws and legislation that impact the managing of human capital. These activities ensure that efficiency, equity, and voice can be achieved in the workplace for both the employer and the employee. But what exactly do we mean by efficiency, equity, and voice?

Efficiency relates to the ability to achieve a workplace goal with a minimal or minimized investment of resources. An employer seeks to achieve efficiency by engaging the most productive human capital and using the least amount of business resources. An employee seeks to achieve efficiency by asking for a specific balance between his or her time contributions to the organization and the economic outputs provided by the employer. Both an employee and an employer want workplace processes to be structured in such a way that each feels there is value for what they are contributing. Efficiency addresses the questions of: am I getting an equal or opposite response to the amount of work I am putting in? Are you motivated to help me be successful? Can I trust that within our relationship, you have my best interest in mind?

Equity relates to the partnership ideal in the relationship between the employer and the employee. The key to understanding equity is identifying with the fact that the business environment is typically not a democracy. An employer creates and enforces the workplace rules and processes that it considers necessary to conducting business. If an employee works for this organization, the anticipation is for them to comply, as employers typically make them aware of these expectations. Is the workplace environment stable and fair? Is there room to grow and do more? Am I treated like a subordinate or a true partner? These are just some of the questions asked when assessing the equity in the relationship between the employer and the employee.

In personal relationships, there are times when one person feels that the other is not listening. The same applies to the relationship between employer/employee. Employees typically want to work for an employer who enables them to be heard and to contribute to the functioning of the organization. An employer wants an organization in which employees have actively listened to and engaged in the proper application of any workplace rules, processes, and procedures, with minimal to no infraction. In both cases, the employee and employer are looking to “achieve voice” in their organizations. Most, if not all, organizations try to assist in the achievement of voice by providing hotlines for employees to communicate, implementing suggestion boxes for the anonymous submission of ideas or comments about the workplace environment, and establishing an open door policy. Because the employer is the more dominant partner in this relationship, the balance between efficiency, equity, and voice can appear to be a bit one sided; this is where labor and employee relations step in.

Ethical conduct requires us to ask difficult questions. Firms need to make the distinction between legal compliance and ethical decision making. Ethical lapses have been responsible for U.S. companies losing billions of dollars in class action law suits. Individual employees must also take responsibility to adhere to their firms’ codes of conduct, codes of ethics, and various policies written to protect the employee, the company, the community and other entities their organization serves Articles below describe some of the issues and challenges faced by human resource professionals today to ensure these codes of conduct, codes of ethics and company policies are disseminated, acknowledged and followed and accurately reflect the values and mission of their firms.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 11 hours.

 

REORIENTATION – STEPS TOWARDS AN EGALITARIAN AND HAPPYY SOCIETY

REORIENTATION – STEPS TOWARDS AN  EGALITARIAN AND HAPPYY SOCIETY

I have been advocating “political action” through civil society in preference to the divisive system of political parties. It is apparent that this theme is not accepted by vast majorities and questions have been posed as to how progress for the society is possible by deviating from this commonly adopted course. If you go through the happiness index for the countries, you will find Switzerland in the lead. I have posted this article as a good example of “direct democracy” results over the divisive and nonperforming “INDIRECT DEMOCRACY” system that we have inherited.

 

How Switzerland’s political system works

Switzerland is a direct democracy, where the people can influence the activities of government through initiatives and referendums. The political process is played out at three levels, federal, cantonal and communal.

WAY FORWARD:

We have a well-defined social structure in place but not moving forward at a desirable speed – mainly because the three targets defined over a 25-year life span got mixed up through a DONOR DRIVEN IMPETUS and did not get the missionary zeal required for these ambitions of the GUIDE.

Please go through and implement in the working procedures the eight guideline booklets issued by AKDN which are designed to establish a FIELD DRIVEN system aimed towards HELPING PEOPLE HELP THEMSELVES in achieving a BETTER TOMORROW.

These are:

1.  Problems in Managing Organisations 
2.  Skills in Managing Organisations 
3.  Improving Management 
4.  The Boards and its Functions 
5.  Organisational Structures and Systems 
6.  Managing People and their Work 
7.  Managing Finance 
8.  Building a More Civil Society  

GB government  (PRESS RELEASE   dated 05th December 2016 is a positive step in this direction

 

REORIENTATION – STEPS TOWARDS AN EGALITARIAN AND HAPPYY SOCIETY

I have been advocating “political action” through civil society in preference to the divisive system of political parties. It is apparent that this theme is not accepted by vast majorities and questions have been posed as to how progress for the society is possible by deviating from this commonly adopted course. If you go through the happiness index for the countries, you will find Switzerland in the lead. I have posted this article as a good example of “direct democracy” results over the divisive and nonperforming “INDIRECT DEMOCRACY” system that we have inherited.

How Switzerland’s political system works

Switzerland is a direct democracy, where the people can influence the activities of government through initiatives and referendums. The political process is played out at three levels, federal, cantonal and communal.

WAY FORWARD:

We have a well-defined social structure in place but not moving forward at a desirable speed – mainly because the three targets defined over a 25-year life span got mixed up through a DONOR DRIVEN IMPETUS and did not get the missionary zeal required for these ambitions of the GUIDE.

Please go through and implement in the working procedures the eight guideline booklets issued by AKDN which are designed to establish a FIELD DRIVEN system aimed towards HELPING PEOPLE HELP THEMSELVES in achieving a BETTER TOMORROW. These are:

  1. https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/7415b355-6c4d-437f-bc1c-18b844ddc41c
  2. https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/fc3542cb-55e6-4722-9de0-2c594fbd0032
  3. https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/984a3aba-7629-4c39-b6ee-b8514a5d2455
  4. https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/4ca1e1cf-127c-410c-91da-4653ab3ccc29
  5. https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/9d0709ec-221b-49ad-937b-16696dac2d34
  6. https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/9822f88b-b023-4569-836a-586b48420465
  7. https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/831d1f2c-3f60-4883-a6ab-41c3ba25feff
  8. https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/b29293a4-fe74-4752-952d-bb525d1dd8e4

GB government press release dated 05th December 2016 (https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1359431604075389&set=a.609120032439887.1073741828.100000256889281&type=3&theater0  ) is a positive step in this direction.